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Category Archives: PowerShell

Get totals from a list view using PowerShell

Today I will share a short script for getting totals from a list view in SharePoint. Imagine this scenario: you have set up a list view with totals and you want get the totals every day for statistics or some other reasons. Instead of getting all items, and/or fiddling around with CamlQueries, there is a better and quicker way – List.RenderListData. This combined with a tip from Piyush K Singhs blog post Get Aggregate Values… I came up with an idea to read the ViewXml from an existing view and retrieve the totals (in my case Count and Sum). Enough talking, let’s take a look at the code:

The good part of that approach is that you can let your view evolve over time and work together with colleagues on that, your script does not need an update every time you change the view. The only thing it alters is the RowLimit – that’s for better performance. Why load 30 or more list items when 1 is enough.

I have tested it in SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online.

My PowerShell Profile

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 20.52.26

It has been a while I last worked with PowerShell. I had my custom profile where I had my own prompt and some other customizations. Now I cannot find it anymore. I’ll start with the new one and I am saving it on my blog, so it will be easier to find in future:

Function Prompt {
    $PromptData="PS $($executionContext.SessionState.Path.CurrentLocation)$('>' * ($nestedPromptLevel + 1)) "
    $host.ui.RawUI.WindowTitle=$PromptData
       +'-'+(Get-Date).tostring()
    # .Link# http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=225750
    # .ExternalHelp System.Management.Automation.dll-help.xml
}

The prompt function comes from the scripting guy blog.

To customize your profile, just open it in a text editor (in my case: code)

code $profile

Update 2018-04-10

You can also include these lines:

$path1 = "C:\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\"
$path2 = "15"
Add-Type -Path  "$path1\$path2\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll"
Add-Type -Path  "$path1\$path2\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Runtime.dll"

VS Code
Now we can run VS Code to create ps1 scripts and run selections as we did it in PowerShell ISE.

Export SharePoint List Data To Xml through PowerShell

Today my colleague Johannes Milling wrote an awesome post:

Export SharePoint List Data To XML Directly from the GUI

He uses the old and forgotten RPC-based web service owssvr.dll (that has existed since SharePoint 2003). This url pattern is used to get the xml-formatted list data for a specific ListView:

http://<site_url>/_vti_bin/owssvr.dll?Cmd=Display&List=<list guid>&View=<view guid>&Query=*&XMLDATA=TRUE

To automate this I have written a PowerShell function. All the details are in the comments:

function Export-OIPSPListDataAsXml {
<#
.Synopsis
   Exports list items as xml
.DESCRIPTION
   This function uses a built-in hidden service owssvr.dll in SharePoint
.PARAMETER Web
   SPWeb or a url for the SPWeb object where the list resides
.PARAMETER ListName
   List Name (List Title)
.PARAMETER ViewName
   Name of the List View to export the data
.EXAMPLE
   Export-OIPSPListView -Web http://myawesomesite -ListName "Teddy Bears" -ViewName "All Items"
.EXAMPLE
   Export-OIPSPListView -Web $webInstance -ListName "Top Links" -ViewName "All Items"
.Notes
    Name: Export-OIPSPListDataAsXml
    Author: Anatoly Mironov
    Last Edit: 2014-09-11
    Keywords: SPList, SPWeb, SPListView, Xml
.Link
	http://chuvash.eu
#>
    [CmdLetBinding()]
    param(
	[Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
    [Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.SPWebPipeBind]$Web,
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
    [string]$ListName,
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
    [string]$ViewName)

    $spWeb = $Web.Read()
    $list = $spWeb.Lists[$ListName]
    if (!$list) { throw "List $ListName on web $($spWeb.Url) could not be found" }
    $view = $list.Views[$ViewName]
    if (!$view) { throw "View $ViewName on web $ListName could not be found" }
    $url = "{0}/_vti_bin/owssvr.dll?Cmd=Display&List={1}&View={2}&Query=*&XMLDATA=TRUE" `
            -f $spWeb.Url, $list.ID, $view.ID
    $wc = New-Object Net.WebClient
    $wc.UseDefaultCredentials = $true
    $wc.DownloadString($url)
}

Showing Birthdays and Job Anniversaries in the Newsfeed

anniversary-001

In our project we have a requirement to show birthdays and job anniversaries in the Newsfeed. The solution is simple (when you know it) but there has not been any information about it online, until today. I want to share a few lines of PowerShell code to enable Anniversary notifications in the Newsfeed. This desired piece of code was written by my colleague Emma Degerman. Enjoy:

$job = Get-SPTimerJob | ? { $_.TypeName -like "*.UserProfileChangeJob" }
$job.GenerateAnniversaries = $true
$job.Schedule = [Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSchedule]::FromString("hourly between 55 and 55")
$job.Update()

The code retrieves the Timer Job that changes User Profiles, sets “GenerateAnniversaries” to true, then it updates the schedule to run it before the Activity Feed Timer Job and updates it. By the way, it is only applicable for SharePoint On Premises.

This is it, a quick tip for a great Intranet.

Load git into PowerShell

Just a little productivity tip. If you use git on Windows, you probably already have the Github for Windows application. This application adds the Git Shell:

006-gitshell

The Git Shell will open a PowerShell window and execute shell.ps1 from the Github directory:

007-gitshell

What it won’t do is to load your personal PowerShell profile. I want to use my PowerShell profile that creates some links and adjust the look-and-feel and the promt of the shell. By the way I have published my profile.ps1 as a gist:

I also want to have git in PowerShell available directly. The answer is in the shell.ps1 in the Github folder:

008-gitshell

So add this line to your profile.ps1 as I did:

. (Resolve-Path "$env:LOCALAPPDATA\GitHub\shell.ps1")

That’s it. If you haven’t seen the “DOT” in PowerShell scripts, it is called dot sourcing, it will execute the script and keep all the variables and references within the script.

An alternative

If you do not have Github for Windows, there is another way to load git functionality into PowerShell:

A presentation about PowerShell and SharePoint

Yesterday I had a little presentation about PowerShell basics in the SharePoint context. Here you can see the presentation I’ve published on slideshare. The text is in Swedish.

A PowerShell one liner

PowerShell is powerful. You can write concise, well formulated, functional-style code. Recently I got the following quiz:

You’ve got $100. You have to buy exactly 100 animal, at least 1 dog, 1 cat and 1 mouse. 1 dog costs $15, 1 cat costs $1, 1 mouse costs $0.25.

There can be  many ways to solve it. But look at this one line solution. It is quite impressive what you can do with PowerShell

1..98 | % {
    $dog = $_
    1..98 | % {
      $cat = $_
      @{
        "Dog" = $dog
        "Cat" = $cat
        "Mouse" = 100 - $dog -$cat
      }
    }
  } | ? {
      $_.Mouse -gt 0
  } | ? { $_.Dog * 15 + $_.Cat * 1 + $_.Mouse * 0.25 -eq 100 }

This solution uses ranges, dynamic objects (PSObject), nested for loops, implicit returns and advanced filtering. All that is is out-of-the-box PowerShell.

Debugging “What’s happening” in Communities

Recently an issue was reported about count mismatches in SharePoint 2013 Communities. The number of replies in category tiles sometimes is different compared to the community stats in the web part called “What’s happening”. The actual number of replies is 1 in the figure below. The user who has reported has tried to add, update and delete discussions and replies.

 

category-replies-count.png   comm-002

I have invested some time debugging this issue. It would be pity to not share my findings. Well the first thing to do was to determine the type name for the “What’s happening” web part. To do so just edit the  page and export the web part. In the exported .webpart file I saw that the type was Microsoft.SharePoint.Portal.WebControls.DashboardWebPart.

With that knowledge it is time to open ILSpy, an awesome and free(!) assembly browser and decompiler. Load the “Microsoft.SharePoint.Portal” assembly from GAC into ILSpy. Then use F3 to search for DashboardWebPart:

comm-003

The number of replies is retrieved from SPWeb.AllProperties:

comm-004

If the Property Bag does not contain it, it gets the number of replies from the list. The formula is as follows:

list.ItemCount - list.RootFolder.ItemCount

It means that it gets the number of both discussions and replies: ItemCount of Discusssions List. The number of Discussions is determined by the ItemCount in the RootFolder of the Discussions List. Discussions are List Items in the RootFolder (num2 in the figure below). Replies are saved in the subfolders, every discussion gets an own folder. The number of all replies are num3 in the figure below.

comm-005

After checking the web properties I could see that the number of replies there were wrong: 2.

The next step was to determine where and when the Web Properties are updated. The first guess every SharePoint Developer has in such cases is an EventReceiver. Here are all EventReceivers connected to the Discussions List:

$list.EventReceivers | select class, Type, Synchronization | Out-GridView

comm-006

Allright, CommunityEventReceiver then:

comm-007

Found where the actual update happens: CommunityUtils.UpdateWebIndexedPropertyBag

comm-008

The method is used in DiscussionListCommunityEventHandler.HandleEvent

comm-009

There is a flag, flag5 that is used to determine if the Web Properties should be updated:

comm-010

But the flag5 is not true on Delete operations in some code flows:

comm-011

 

That’s it. So deleting a reply will not have any effect on “What’s happening”. But adding a new discussion will also update the stats:

comm-012

To summarize the debug session, there is an issue in the OOB code that misses to update community stats when deleting a discussion or a reply. Adding a new discussion, or a reply will synchronize the stats.

PowerShell: Get version and ProductId from an .app package

In my project I deploy some apps directly through the ObjectModel directly with PowerShell. The apps are built with TFS

I have a script that installs or updates apps if there is a new version of the app. Previously I used Import-SPAppPackage to compare the version and productid with an existing app instance, but often I get this error:

The provided App differs from another App with the same version and product ID.

Here you have the issue. Now the solution is to read the AppManifest.xml. But first the .app package has to be extracted like a usual zip file. This is the powershell function for that:

function Get-SPAppPackageMetadata {
  <#
  .SYNOPSIS
    Gets the version and productid of an app package
  .DESCRIPTION
    This function extracts the AppManifest.xml from the app and gets the Version and the ProductId
  .EXAMPLE
    Get-SPAppPackageMetadata- AppPackagePath "C:\folder\app.publish\1.0.0.1\App1.app"
  .PARAMETER AppPackagePath
    The path to the new version of the app
  .Notes
        Name: Get-SPAppPackageVersion
        Author: Anatoly Mironov
        Last Edit: 2013-12-05
        Keywords: SPApp, SPAppInstance
  .Link
        http://chuvash.eu
  #>
    [CmdLetBinding()]
    param([Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][string]$AppPackagePath)

    $shell = new-object -com shell.application
    $item = get-item $AppPackagePath
    $zipFilePath = $item.FullName + ".zip"
    
    $directory = $item.Directory.FullName
    Copy-Item $item $zipFilePath
    $manifest = @{ "Name" = "AppManifest.xml" }
    $manifest.Path = Join-Path $directory $manifest.Name
    $manifest.File = $shell.NameSpace($zipFilePath).Items() | ? { $_.Name -eq $manifest.Name }
    $shell.Namespace($directory).CopyHere($manifest.File)
    $manifest.Xml = [xml](get-content $manifest.Path)
    $metadata = @{
        "VersionString" = $manifest.Xml.App.Version
        "ProductId" = $manifest.Xml.App.ProductID
    }


    Remove-Item $zipFilePath
    Remove-Item $manifest.Path

    return $metadata
}
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